Greek Couscous Salad

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5 from 11 votes
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This Greek couscous salad recipe is vibrant and bursting with bold Mediterranean flavors. Made in minutes, I love serving it as a healthy side dish OR the main course!

Need more healthy salads? Try my rotisserie chicken salad, avocado chicken salad, steak salad, healthy pasta salad, or Jennifer Aniston salad next!

Greek couscous salad.

Ever since I learned how to cook couscous, it’s become a weekly staple in our household. I’m always looking for new recipes to use it with, and being a lover of Greek salad, I figured why not pair the two to create an even heartier, more flavorful dish?

Table of Contents
  1. Why I love this recipe
  2. Ingredients needed
  3. How to make Greek couscous salad
  4. Arman’s recipe tips
  5. Storage instructions
  6. Greek Couscous Salad (Recipe Card)

Why I love this recipe

  • Hearty and healthy. Couscous comes from semolina and is naturally high in fiber and low in calories. When paired with fresh vegetables and a healthy-fat dressing, it’s even better. 
  • Easy to customize. You can add, swap, or substitute just about every ingredient to save time or spare you a trip to the store. 
  • A perfect make-ahead salad. Make a massive batch and keep the dressing separate. Portion the salad for meal prep, or top with the dressing right before serving. 

Ingredients needed

  • Couscous. Cook your couscous according to the package directions. If the directions say to add butter at the end, I’d skip that step since it’ll make mixing the couscous with the other ingredients harder. 
  • Tomatoes. Use either Roma tomatoes or halved cherry tomatoes. 
  • Cucumber. I like Persian cucumbers since they’re smaller and sweeter, but any kind will do. 
  • Red onion. I definitely suggest using red onion over white onion, which will be too overpowering. 
  • Black olives. For a salty, briny flavor. I also tried kalamata olives, and both were delicious, so use whichever you have on hand.
  • Feta cheese. I tested both crumbled feta and feta from a block, and I preferred the block as it’s less salty and has a creamier texture.

For the Greek dressing:

  • Olive oil. What good couscous salad doesn’t have olive oil as part of the dressing?
  • Red wine vinegar. For an authentic flavor.
  • Lemon juice. Elevates the other ingredients and adds a pleasant tang. 
  • Oregano. A popular Greek spice, this takes the salad to another level!
  • Salt and pepper. To taste.

How to make Greek couscous salad

I’ve included step-by-step photos below to make this recipe easy to follow at home. For the full printable recipe instructions and ingredient quantities, scroll to the recipe card at the bottom of this post.

Step 1- Make the salad dressing. In a small bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients until combined. 

Step 2- Mix. In a large mixing bowl, add the rest of the ingredients and mix to combine. 

Step 3- Dress. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix to combine. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

Greek pearl couscous salad.

Arman’s recipe tips

  • Cool and fluff the couscous with a fork. My #1 tip for making couscous salad is to make sure ALL of the ingredients are at the same temperature. So, if you’re making your couscous fresh, make sure it’s fully cooled. 
  • Cook the couscous in chicken broth. For more flavor. 
  • Play around with different textures. Chop the veggies into different shapes to create a fun texture change. For instance, I like to halve the olives lengthwise and cut the cucumbers into ribbons.

Variations

  • Add protein. Fold in crumbled tofu, Greek chicken, or sautéed salmon for an extra protein boost.  
  • Add a crunch factor. Top the salad with slivered almonds, pine nuts, or roasted chickpeas
  • Experiment with mix-ins. Add some roasted garlic, capers, avocado, artichoke hearts, or pepperoncini peppers.
  • Garnish. Top the salad with fresh parsley or basil for an extra pop of color. 
  • Serve your couscous salad in Greek wraps or in these Greek chicken bowls!

Storage instructions

To store: Leftover salad should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. If the dressing is already mixed in, don’t worry; just give it a good toss before serving. I don’t recommend freezing this salad since the veggies will become mushy once thawed. 

couscous greek salad.
greek couscous salad recipe.

Greek Couscous Salad

5 from 11 votes
This Greek couscous salad recipe is vibrant and bursting with bold Mediterranean flavors. Made in minutes, I love serving it as a healthy side dish OR the main course!
Servings: 4 servings
Prep: 5 minutes
Total: 5 minutes

Ingredients  

  • 1 1/2 cups couscous cooked
  • 1/2 cup tomatoes diced
  • 1/2 cup cucumbers chopped
  • 1/4 cup feta cheese
  • 1/4 cup black olives sliced
  • 1/4 cup red onion chopped

For the Greek Salad Dressing

  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoon Red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon Oregano dried
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Instructions 

  • Prepare the salad dressing, by whisking together the olive oil, red wine vinegar, lemon juice, and dried oregano. Add salt and pepper, to taste.
  • In a large mixing bowl, add your fluffed couscous, tomatoes, cucumber, feta cheese, sliced olives, and red onion, and mix until just combined.
  • Pour the dressing over it and mix very well, until the dressing is fully incorporated into the salad. Serve immediately, or refrigerate.

Notes

TO STORE: Leftover salad should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. If the dressing is already mixed in, don’t worry; just give it a good toss before serving. I don’t recommend freezing this salad since the veggies will become mushy once thawed. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1servingCalories: 177kcalCarbohydrates: 17gProtein: 4gFat: 10gSodium: 532mgPotassium: 115mgFiber: 2gVitamin A: 228IUVitamin C: 5mgCalcium: 59mgIron: 1mgNET CARBS: 15g
Course: Salad
Cuisine: Mediterranean
Author: Arman Liew
Tried this recipe?Give us a shout at @thebigmansworld or tag #thebigmansworld!

Originally published April 2020, updated and republished May 2024

Arman Liew

I’m a two time cookbook author, photographer, and writer, and passionate about creating easy and healthier recipes. I believe you don’t need to be experienced in the kitchen to make good food using simple ingredients that most importantly, taste delicious.

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Comments

  1. A salad would be the last thing I’d order in Italy. 🙂 Just give me a pasta with a simple tomato sauce and I’d be more than happy.

    Mediterranean couscous with a vegan cheese sounds divine. Looks fantastic Arman.

    1. Thanks so much, Linda! YES. I had the best pasta there which was simply pasta with olive oil and garlic- SO GOOD!

  2. Rumor has it I’ve come to be known as “the weird vegetarian” because I don’t like salad. Salad salad that is. All that leafy nnothingness … Grain salads have always been my favourites as they don’t give me the feeling of eating salad but something that’s actually substantial. If you serve me this: lettuce be friends [said in Alexis’ voice]! Just add some chickpeas to my serving.

  3. What about spinach? Can I have spinach? Cause I load my bowl with it to make my salads like a mountain. Also to get some iron. Other than that I pile EVERYTHING and then some into my bowl, with chips or pretzels on the side. I have to have some salty crunch. Usually some bean, rice, avocado, tomato…and I’m happy. This looks so good. I now want to go to Italy.

  4. You could totally be my friend if you bring me this salad.

    Also, I need to hookup for the Pope’s private herb garden. Can you make that happen? VIP service please.

    I’m working on a recipe today that is going to make you LOVE your GREENS.

    1. ….I thought we were friends. Potato brothers. Cauliflower…cuckoos?

      If it’s the teaser I saw I’m already a fan!

  5. Gah, I haven’t found gluten-free couscous anywhere! I guess quinoa would work?

  6. My favorite salad ingredient is chickpeas. Actually, my favorite ingredient in general is probably chickpeas. They might actually work in this salad =P

  7. The answer is lettuce. Always lettuce. In all honesty, though, I’m pretty open when it comes to what goes into my salads. Avocado is almost always a must, and then I toss in whatever else I happen to have lying round. Mango is freaking amazing, and raisins too. Don’t come near me with olives, though. Do.not.like.

  8. Anything with feta gets my attention. You’ve created a wonderful salad here, and it’s a bonus that it has couscous (which is a fun word to say.)

  9. I wish I liked olives more. Something about them just makes me go mehh. If for nothing more than drinking more martini’s, I want to like olives. I guess that’s something to try and work on… if liking olives qualifies as some personal development material. I’m all about the cheese in a salad. Gots to have that cheddar yo! Lettuce.

    1. Lettuce add cheddar next time. I used to hate olives as a kid after reading a book where the kid hated it!

  10. Okay this looks totally awesome. I absolutely love feta cheese and olives. They are my favourite combination. I even love just throwing together tomatoes, cucumbers, feta, olives, and a tiny bit of olive oil. No need for lettuce. I’ve never thought of adding a grain like this though. YUM.

    Never, ever order a salad in Italy. You are totally right about their ingredients though. Italians don’t take their salads very seriously. Even my grandmother would only toss mixed greens with oil and vinegar when I was younger. The effort goes into the good stuff – pizza and pasta!

    1. YESSSSS. I’m not surprised their prices were to elevated!

      ….Can I come to Nonna’s for dinner? I’ll bring panatone and bakala.

  11. Yay for Greek salads! They seem to be the thing to make right now. I’m loving your version and that you used couscous!

  12. Oh, how I want to go to Italy and eat EVERYTHING! Cheese and something with a “crunch” are musts on a salad for me 🙂